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Access a range of articles and resources written by clinical governance experts and search our carefully curated list of safety and quality journal articles and reports.

AICG articles, resources and curated journals and reports are available to all AICG members. Members must be logged in, in order to access all content. Users who are not AICG members will only be able to access publicly available articles. 

AICG Articles

Showing 1–3 of 3 articles
Why saying ‘sorry’ is important to clinical governance
Why saying ‘sorry’ is important to clinical governance

Saying sorry is an important element of open disclosure and psychological safety – and therefore clinical governance. It is also an extremely powerful yet simple way to make people ‘feel better’. Saying sorry conveys empathy, compassion, and respect towards the person receiving the apology, not to mention remorse. It acknowledges an acceptance that your actions (or words) can adversely impact others, and is the opposite of defensiveness (which is counter-productive). Apologising is not taking the blame, nor is it an admission of liability. Saying sorry is about being accountable, accepting responsibility, and restoring trust in a relationship.

Compassion
Culture
Open Disclosure
Psychological Safety
Self-reflection
Let’s not be tone-deaf
Let’s not be tone-deaf

It’s not just what we say, it’s how we say it. We know effective communication is key to patient safety and quality, and person-centred care. But it is also crucial to psychological safety and the extent to which we support each other in speaking out, or in asking questions. This in turn will impact patient care.

Compassion
Negative behaviours
Psychological Safety
Self-reflection
Speaking Out
Caring for those who care
Caring for those who care

The concept of ‘burnout’ was first described in the early 1970s, and has attracted media attention in recent years specifically in the context of healthcare. It is known to be particularly prevalent within certain demographics, compounded by the COVID-19 pandemic.  Burnout is not unique to acute health services, with evidence of its prevalence seen in other care sectors such as aged care and disability.

Aged care
Burnout
Compassion
Disability
Healthcare
Mental health
Occupational Health
WHS
Workforce
Showing 1–3 of 3 articles